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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but the u.s. has declined. the united states has never proposed iran a comprehensive package. never. my point is this. first, try at least once. i real hi don't care in iran whether we have a conservative or moderate president or reformist because i have been working for 16 years under the presidents and i know we did our utmost to get a good -- to bring the relation, to improve the relation with the u.s. and the u.s. always declined. therefore, this is the same policy during ahmadinajed. but they have better justification during ahmadinajed. they use the holocaust and all the these rhetorics which is very harmful for iran's national interests. my suggestion is this. any u.s. administration i hope after the election -- because we cannot talk before the election -- propose at least once after 33 years a comprehensive package including terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, peace process, israel, human rights, democracy, all these major points for the u.s. and iranians also they have their own shopping list. and the u.s. also should be prepared to address iranian concerns. if it failed,
the united states. you must be tired. you sit, i'll talk. you listen. and so i did. then he said this. and he repeated it again and again. where is american leadership? we need american leadership. where is american leadership? then he'd talk about a region of the world and what was happening in that region. then he'd say where is american leadership? then he'd go to another region and talk about the challenges there. where is american leadership? the world has always looked to us as the shining city on the hill. that light looks dimmer. we keep kicking the challenges down the road and hope someone else will deal with it. that time is now ours. this is the greatest generation that left us this nation so prosperous and so free. now it's our turn. they've held the torch alost for the whole world to see. a torch of freedom, opportunity and hope. they're getting fewer and further between, the greatest generation. they can't hold it quite as high as they used to. it's our turn to grab the torch. when i became president -- [ cheers and applause ] -- we're going to do what we have to do, we're going
, tribal, territorial and international partners and members of this committee. while the united states has made significant progress since the 9/11 attacks, we know threats from terror persist and continually evolve. we faced direct threats from al qaeda. we face growing threats of other foreign-based terrorist groups, which are inspired by al qaeda ideology, such as hq ap and al-shabaab. we must address threats that are homegrown as well as those that originate abroad. is threats are not limited to any one individual, group or ideology and as we have seen taxes employed by terrorists can be as simple as a homemade bomb or as sophisticated as the biologic threat or coordinated cyberattack. while we deal with a number of threats and threat actors at any given time, three areas merit special sustained attention. the first is aviation. christmas day 2000 plot, the october 2010th air cargo thread in the aqa peapod earlier this year would have targeted a u.s. bound airliner with explosives made clear that commercial aviation remains a target. terrace, especially aqap continue to seek ways to ci
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
-- the world of nation-state, those independent units that are truly sovereign and do not depend or take orders from anywhere else. the west can no longer do what it assumed it could do for its citizens. it needs to reach out for help. so you have got this system living in an uneasy coexistence with this globalize the world, and you say, "are we losing power?" though the very nature of power is different now than it used to be. you all in your textbooks say, cassette and these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other" -- "these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other," but it is much more complicated now. >> i would add that the concept of what makes up national security has changed. it is a much broader field now. you have to deal with economic issues. you have to deal with cybersecurity. you have to deal with a world that is largely asymmetric. as we play it back on the 20th century, which was not that long ago, you almost yearn for the ordered ways of the 20th century. we had essentially a bipolar world, two different ideologie
. >> does it surprise you that the united states doesn't take any other actions other than what they call nonlethal support? do it surprise you they don't want to arm the rebels, for instance or talk about a no-fly zone or buffer zone or safe zones? >> translator: right now there are certain things being expected from the united states. the united states had not yet catered to those expectations. maybe it's because of the elections, maybe it's because of the pre-election situation in the states. nobody has spoken to us about their reasons and they are not obliged to state anything. we're very thankful and pleased they have stated they are against this regime. >> it's good to see you. hearing what he said, can you give me a broader context of what he was explaining? >> reporter: i think he's very frustrated. he's a good friend of united states and a good friend to the obama administration. he didn't want to come out and directly sledge hammer the obama administration but he did say he is frustrated. perhaps the elections are playing part in the fact that the united states is not leading in
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
of these united states. >> my favorite job was having a boss who gave the order to take out bin laden and whose cool is all of us getting gay married. so thank you invisible man in the chair for that. >> what do you say to people if you just--you know, i know people-- >> do you think that president obama doesn't love this country? >> i think he's more about a global being global, um, what's the word-- >> you're absolutely crazy. >> i just don't believe that he loves america the way that we do. i mean-- >> we who? >> he's more about one world. >> what does that mean? >> i just explained it to you. >> we can no longer sit quietly or stand on the sidelines and watch our country go the way of socialism or something much worse. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> today the thrill of president obama is gone. >> americans feel no hope, and have seen the change for the worse. democrats are dispirited enthusiasm is clearly on the republican side. [applause] >> all across america manufacturing is rebounding! why! let's reelect our great president barack obama! >> are you going to vote on election day? >> probably. i ha
of their individual country members, an [inaudible] that tends to be the united states and a few others. so yes, there's has been some reor yenation. there's the strengthening of international substitutes. yes, country like china, india, brazil need to be gavin given a larger role. they are nottism executing. they need leadership from within. and brent's point is there are not a lot of countries who are capable or trusted to provide that leadership. and that's why [inaudible] there is a defusion of power in the world even though that's going change how the united states leads in the world, i think brent is right. and i think general jones would agree, we need to get our house in order for domestic purposes but also so we can help provide leadership for the international community in dealing with the problems. >> i think -- [inaudible] the attitude is understandable. the world doesn't appreciate it. to hell with them. let's take care of ourselves. we're not talking about leadership in the world as an awe truistic thing. school of foreign service it's a fallup question to that. america has created an in
further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize rhis columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rate short trem interest rates are already essentily at zero, the fed mov
allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republican for which it stands one nation under god, we'll see you monday. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> eliot: good evening i'm eliot spitzer is "viewpoint." after a show start thursday president obama closed the democratic convention with some soaring rhetoric in the promise of a rising middle class economy. >> obama: if you believe that new plants and factories can dot our landscape, that new energy can power our future that new schools can provide ladders of opportunity to this nation of dreamers, if you believe in a country where everyone gets a fair shot, and everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules then i need you to vote this november. [applause] >> eot: you again as the president spoke he may have already known that the august's jobs report would flatten his bump coming out of the convention and weaken his chances for re-election this fall. while most economists expected 125,000 new jobs last month, the labor department reported just 96,000 new private sec
are talking the. they are manufactured within the united states or elsewhere. .. each one of those elements are probably designed in multiple countries most likely manufacture the components in multiple countries. they were integrated components in multiple countries, and that becomes the particular product. any one of these tablets or computers or smart phones that you have has likely touched more than 40 countries along the way. is it really possible to talk about an indigenous manufacturing them as we are managing the risk? the distribution. we need to think about secure distribution channels that distribution of all of the multiple components coming into another component that then goes to market, and when we think about that distribution channel and that procurement channel, we need to give the vendors credit that they actually have vetted their suppliers and those distribution channels because they don't want counterfeit products getting to market, so we need to use their trusten channel partners, their value added resellers and or off of the vetted tables of gsa and at the end of the
, but the president of the united states is not quite yet. this is urbandale, iowa. this is a big rally and this will be the president's seventh stop in iowa leading up to presidential election this november. all of this as he kicks off the warm-up act before the dnc gets under way this week in charlotte. we'll take you back to urbandale, iowa, as soon as the president arrives. >>> all right. a check of some of the news happening right now overseas. in central afghanistan two suicide bombers have targeted an afghan military base. the attacks killed 13 people, among the dead, a child, two women and four policemen. the taliban has claimed responsibility. >>> in south africa, protests are breaking out over the arrest of 270 platinum mine workers charged with the murder of 34 of their colleagues, but those workers were actually shot by police. south africa's justice minister is now demanding answers. >> after 50 years, the german inventor of the drug thalidomide has apologized to its victims. the drug taken by pregnant women caused babies to be born with deformed limbs. the head of a surviv
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
assembly today. he had a tough message for iran. >> and that's why the united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> he also had a clear message for the muslim world when it comes to insults against islam and freedom of speech. get a thicker skin. >> as president of our country, and commander in chief of our military, i accept that people are going to call me awful things every day. and i will always defend their right to do so. >> well, clearly, the president felt he had important things to say. now, you'd think he would be eager to expand on them one-on-one with some of the key players, some other world leaders, face-to-face. this is, after all an explosive moment on the international scene. this week, nearly anyone who's anyone happens to be here in new york. president obama took off from new york today having held precisely zero formal face-to-face meetings with anyone, none, with the exception of a quick word with the president of yemen, who was meeting with deputy national security advisor john brennan. he skipped the traditional luncheon, le
of the united states. i've got a very effective campaign doing a very good job, but not everything i say is elegant and i want to make it very clear, i want to help 100% of the people. >> dave: he followed up by saying, you know, you didn't totally answer that question, but to romney's point. do you need a complete change of direction or turn around or campaign better and minimize mistake. comes down to debate. october 3rd the big first debate. >> and like that he addressed the 47%, hey, i wasn't an elegant speaker and i do want to help all americans. >> clayton: now more on that, and could it come down to foreign policy? we'll ask chris wallace about that coming up in a little bit. the number of able bodied americans on food stamps has doubled as president obama changed to welfare reform law. how can it be a fair and balanced debate. >> not so sweet 16. thousands of teenagers showing up and reuting in the streets. ahead. ♪ ♪ where's the party, i want to free my soul ♪ ♪ where's the party, i want to lose control ♪ ♪ where's the party (car horn) paying with your smartphone ins
is not a challenge that can be contained. it will threaten the elimination of israel. the united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> reporter: after his remarks, he crossed town to the clinton global initiative where he addressed an issue with potential appeal to evangelical and women voters, human sex trafficking. >> that's slavery. it is barbaric and it is evil and it has no place in a civilized world. >> reporter: wolf, on other top foreign policy concerns, he addressed the crisis in syria, he mentioned the withdrawal of troops from iraq and the draw down from afghanistan and the trouble between israel and the palestinians. but that was all. he essentially was checking the box on all those fronts. and no mention at all of china. in essence, wolf, this was a speech about the two crises that have consumed foreign policy discussion during the u.s. campaign. the tension between israel and iran and now this most recent crisis in libya, wolf. >> with six weeks to go until the election, jessica, tomorrow i take it he's right back out there in the swing states
. >>> the palestinian, israel, iran and the united states and our place within those names. it's all about to be front and center at the united nations today. we have live pictures for you right now. world leaders all taking their turns at the lectern. ours has been there as are a number of other top leaders. and today no exception. today netanyahu and mahmoud abbas will be taking the stage. and all of this is coming in just the next hour. mr. abbas will be up first. he's expected to ask the united nations to give his people the palestinian authority nonmember observer status. that's an expanded kind of status than he has right now. this after last year's failed bid to win u.n. recognition of a palestinian state. now, shortly after he speaks, israel's prime minister will take the podium p. and mr. netanyahu is expected to focus on iran rather than on palestinians. he's likely going to warn the united nations about the threat that israel faces from iran's controversial nuclear program, but his warnings take on a new sense of urgency after making it clear that israel would preemptively attack iran if di
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the west. but khrushchev actually realized th
problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is really, as you say, well, if you give us, let's say, debt relief to greece, well, then you can be pretty sure that other european countries that also have received bailouts will want the same treatment. so what you're trying to do in europe, in minute, is really to-- i believe that ultimately debt relief will have-- further debt relief will have to be given to greece by the euro area governments. but they're really trying to make the road to that so arduous and so terrible that nobody else in europe will really want to go down that route. and as we're looking at greece today-- which has a cumulative decline in g.d.p. of, you know, close to 20% and still dropping-- i think it's
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)

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